4 comments on “Chingo Volcanic Field, Guatemala

  1. As a Spanish speaker I never cease to be amazed at the choice of word to describe this geological phenomenon. I caution people to be careful when traveling in Spanish-speaking countries to familiarize
    Themselves with local colloquial speech.

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    • Good point. Scratched my head about the choice of that particular name for the volcano. Finally decided it was intended to be funny, which makes me smile a bit as it may demonstrate a local sense of humor.

      Timely reminder about local colloquial speech. Even in the same basic language, local regional differences in accents and which words are used how are striking and occasionally problematic. Thanks for taking the time to read the post. Cheers –

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      • I never fail to read these posts. They are well researched and informative. From my work in Spanish-speaking communities I learned very early how words are OK in one culture and not in another. Just up the street from a clinic I was working in was a Club whose name was La Concha. One of my colleagues who was from the Dominican republic was quick to tell me that one could not use that word in normal conversation where she came from. Having wintered in the city of Puerto Vallarta Mexico for several years I can tell you that there is a locally available list of colloquial words common to that part of the state of Jalisco. Tourists are advised to read it carefully. Keep up the good work.

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        • Thank you for your kind words.

          Here in the US, we get similar variations state by state, and an ever-growing list of things to say and not to say. Being within a common border, we are somewhat (or a lot) less deferential to one another’s local differences and demands. As usual, your mileage will vary.

          Cast the net a bit farther into the English speaking world and you quickly get to George Bernard Shaw’s note that the US & Great Britain were two nations divided by a common language. Start tossing in the rest of the former British Empire (Oz and NZ) and language differences get wild.

          Nice to see that Espanol has the same regional problem that English does, mostly because it appears to be a human rather than a nationality issue, which once again makes me smile. If we’re all doing about the same stuff to one another for about the same reasons regardless of locale, that is something to celebrate rather than be shocked by. Best to you and yours.

          Thanks again for your interest in VH. Cheers –

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